Christina Erives

My work stems from my Mexican heritage and family traditions. My interest in creating these objects arises from my fear of these processes being lost and forgotten. Through the use of various objects I hope to render a narrative that seeks to embrace and celebrate these rituals of a new generation. I enjoy seeing these objects evolve through the use of clay just as a story of an event can change over time in the ways of telling it. Ceramics as a material has permanence; it is one of the ways we were able to learn about ancient cultures. There is beauty in these traditions and my aim is to make a mark in my time that will be preserved in the history of ceramic objects. 

Ten Questions with Christina Erives

Why did you choose the clay body that you use?

I like to use earthenware clay bodies because I like the red and brown earth tones.
What inspires your forms?
Most of my work is inspired by the everyday things around me, my home, and family.
What inspires your surface decoration?
I like for my work to be fun, bright, and celebratory, so I usually use vibrant underglaze colors on the surface of most of my work. 
What is your firing process?
I once fire most of my work to cone 05.
What is your favorite form to make?
I really enjoy making my tostada plates right now, they are fun to make and play with surface decoration.
What is your favorite form to use?
I enjoy using all the different cups in my cupboard, I think cups are the easiest to build a connection with because they are held and interacted with the most. 
Which artists or teachers have been your biggest influences?
Patsy Cox, Shannon Goff, Margaret Kinkeade...
What is your favorite piece of advice for aspiring potters?
Just to always keep on making, even when you don't know what to make. It's all a learning process.
If you could choose any location for your work to be used, where would it be?
Anywhere would be nice, I enjoy seeing any of my pieces in action or display whenever an image is shared to me.
If you could choose one person to use your work, who would it be?
I'd be happy to see my pieces in anyone's hands who'd enjoy it.